Dishwasher Won’t Drain? Here Are 8 Steps to Fix it


One of the most common problems reported to plumbers by homeowners is when a dishwasher won’t drain. While it can be scary to open the dishwasher door and see standing water at the bottom, it isn’t always a plumbing emergency. In fact, you may be able to correct the problem yourself without professional help. 

What to Do When Your Dishwasher Won’t Drain 

If draining your dishwasher is an issue, here are eight simple techniques to try at home.

1.  Run the Disposal  

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A full garbage disposal or an air gap in a connecting hose can prevent water from properly draining out of the dishwasher. Simply running the disposal for about 30 seconds may fix the issue.  

2. Check for Blockages  

Check the bottom of the dishwasher to make sure that an item or pieces of food haven’t fallen from the rack to block the water flow.  

3. Load the Dishwasher Correctly  

Make sure you’re loading the dishwasher correctly. Read the manufacturers’ instructions or owner’s manual for tips and directions on how to load dishes for best results. 

4. Clean or Change the Filter 

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You may have a clogged dishwasher filter that’s preventing water from draining. Many homeowners don’t realize that dishwasher filters need to be cleaned regularly. Check your owner’s manual to see where the filter is located on your dishwasher, and for instructions on how and when to clean it. For many dishwashers, the filter can be found on the inside bottom of the appliance. 

5. Inspect the Drain Hose 

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Check the drain hose connecting to the sink and garbage disposal. Straighten any kinks that you may see, which could be causing the problem. Blow through the hose or poke a wire hanger through to check for clogs. Make sure the hose seal is tight, too. 

6. Double-check the Drain Valve 

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Inspect the drain valve found on the valve bracket, often located at the bottom of the machine. Push on the valve to make sure it moves freely and isn’t stuck. 

7. Try Vinegar and Baking Soda 

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Mix together about one cup each of baking soda and vinegar and pour the mixture into the standing water at the bottom of the dishwasher. Leave for about 20 minutes. If the water is draining or starting to drain at that time, rinse with hot water and then run the dishwasher’s rinse cycle. That may be enough to help loosen any clogs or debris that are preventing the dishwasher from draining properly.  

8. Listen to Your Machine While It’s Running 

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Listen to your dishwasher while it’s running a cycle. If it doesn’t make the usual operating sounds, particularly if it’s making a humming or clicking noise, the drain pump and motor may need replacing. If this occurs, it may be time to call a professional for help.  

How to Properly Drain a Dishwasher 

If you need to clear standing water at the bottom of a dishwasher, here’s how to drain it: 

  • Line the floor under the dishwasher with towels or newspaper.  
  • With a measuring cup or a large ladle, scoop the water from the bottom into a bowl or the sink.  
  • When the water becomes too shallow to scoop, soak up the remaining moisture with cloth or paper towels. 

Always make sure that you’re using the right type of dish detergent per manufacturer’s directions, to avoid clogging the drain. Taking some preventative steps to keep your dishwasher running smoothly can also help you avoid drainage issues in the future. 

Looking for an affordable home warranty plan? Here’s where to start: 

10 Steps to Drain Water Out of a Washing Machine


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We know how annoying can be when you go to your laundry area to transfer a load of clothes from the washer to the dryer, but water remains in the washer tub even though the cycle has finished. It can be confusing, frustrating and inconvenient when this happens. You can turn on the spin cycle to see if the water will drain, but if that doesn’t help, you’re right back where you started – with a load of soaking laundry and a washer full of water.  

Why Won’t My Washing Machine Drain Water? 

There are a few possibilities why your washing machine won’t drain. that might happen. Your washer may have a clogged drain hose or the pump may be broken. A broken lid switch or belt could also be the culprit. It may even be something as simple as the hose being jammed. Whatever the reason, the water will need to be drained from the washing machine before any work or diagnosis can be done. 

What Does the Drain Function on a Washing Machine Do? 

It removes the water from the tub during the spin cycle. The washer pump forces water from the bottom of the machine into the drain hose. The drain hose loops to the top of the machine, and then down to the drain, enabling the tub to fill. When the water reaches the bend in the hose, it goes out of the drain. 

How to Drain Water Out of a Washing Machine 

If you have water in your washer that hasn’t drained, you have a couple of options: 

One is to bail it out, but that can be a time consuming and tedious process. It can also be hard on your back to bend over to reach the bottom of the tub repeatedly. An easier way is to let the drain hose and gravity do the hard work for you. Here are some of the things you’ll need to have on hand for the task: 

  • Bucket
  • Screwdriver
  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Sponge and towels
  • Clamp 

Step 1 – Turn off the power 

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Unplug the washer from the outlet or turn off power at the circuit breaker or fuse box. While not mandatory, it’s also a good idea to turn the hot and cold water connections to the washing machine just to be safe.  

Step 2 – Locate the drain hose at the back of the washer 

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First, look to see if it is bent or kinked, which may be blocking the water flow. If that’s the case, simply straightening the hose may fix the problem. If the hose has no visible bends or kinks, then disconnect it from the drain, unscrewing with a clamp attached if necessary. Be sure to keep the hose higher than the washer tub until you’re ready to empty the water.  

Step 3 – Prepare your bucket and drain hose 

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Get the bucket in place and drop the hose lower than the washer tub into the bucket. If the bucket fills, raise the hose above the washer tub until you can empty the bucket and start to fill it again. If the water doesn’t flow freely, the filter may be blocked, which you’ll need to clear before continuing. 

Step 4 – Check for and remove all clogs in the drain hose 

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Once the water has drained, check the hose for a clogged piece of clothing or a soap blockage. Loosen the clamp that connects the hose to the bottom of the tub and inspect the inside. If you see something clogging the hose or a clog where the hose connects, remove it with your pliers and reconnect the hose. 

Step 5 – Check for deeper clogs in the drain or beyond  

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If the hose is clear, there may be a clog in the drain or beyond, which means you’ll likely need to use a plumber’s snake to clear it.  

Step 6 – Inspect the washer pump 

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Check the washer pump, to see if it has a clog or a broken impeller, belt or a leak. Refer to your manufacturer’s instructions for a diagram of your unit’s pump location and parts. In most cases, you’ll notice an unusual noise when the washer is operating that indicates a bad pump, or leaking may also be a sign. If you have a bad pump, you’ll need to replace it or call a qualified service technician for help. If you replace it yourself, be sure to purchase the same pump model.   

Step 7 – Inspect the washing machine lid switch

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To see if the lid switch is working, depress it by hand. If you don’t hear a click, it may be broken and need replacing.  

Step 8 – Inspect the washing machine for damaged belts 

To see if damaged belts are causing your drain problem, unscrew the access panel and check the main belt and the pump belt. Refer to your manufacturer’s diagram to locate these parts. 

Step 9 – Check to see if your configuration includes a washing machine drain vent 

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A drain vent allows air in which can help prevent a vacuum that could hamper water draining properly from the machine.  If there is a gap around the drain hose where it enters the drain, you may not need a vent. You should have a vent if building codes require one or if your washer is more than four feet from the vent stack for proper draining. 

Step 10 – When in doubt, call a service professional for help 

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If you’ve drained the water from your washer and inspected the hose, pump and lid switch and still can’t pinpoint the problem, you’ll probably need to call a professional plumber or washing machine service technician for help.

Home Warranty and Insurance Guide


Aerial view of residential neighborhood with colorful fall foliage North of Dallas, Texas.

Home warranty or home insurance? We vote both.

American Home Shield home warranty plans help pay to repair or replace home systems and appliances – things like A/C, heating, appliances and more. Homeowners insurance helps with the cost of repairs needed as a result of accidental damage or theft – things like natural disasters, fires and break-ins.

Contact your Ebby agent to find out more about how American Home Shield can pick up where homeowners insurance leaves off.

August Home Maintenance


Historic home in Dallas, Texas.

It’s officially the last few weeks of summer! Soon, you’ll be ordering pumpkin spice lattes and decorating for fall. But before you get too far ahead of yourself, it’s time to schedule important end-of-summer home maintenance.

Get rid of unwelcome house guests.
Now is a great time to think about a once-a-year pest control solution. With pests, it’s best to be proactive rather than reactive. When you see them, you can be sure there are more around the corner. A once-a-year pest control solution is the most effective and economical solution there is.

Get out the germs.
We’ve all been in the house more than usual this summer. It might be time to give your home a deep clean. Go beyond mopping the floors and get your dryer vent and air vents cleaned, have your mattresses disinfected and cleaned, have your carpets cleaned and clean your washing machine and dishwasher. Doing a deep clean will improve air quality, reduce energy use, and clear out the germs. 

Get organized.
A new school year is starting, and with that comes a lot of chaos. It’s an excellent time to get organized. Donate or toss things that no longer help you or your kids. If possible, set up a homework station in your home. This not only keeps you organized, but it also helps kids to focus on their schoolwork. You’ll also want to set up a “drop zone,” a place for your kids to drop-off their backpacks, shoes, jackets and anything else they might have carried home.

If the thought of getting organized is overwhelming, there are pros that can help. Professional organizers don’t just move piles around or hide things; they come up with entire systems to help you and your family stay organized.

Zaarly, an Ebby Halliday Realtors partner, helps homeowners find and work with the best home service pros in the North Texas area. Visit Zaarly for assistance with everything from pest control and cleaning to home organization.