How to Make Your Bouquet Last Longer


Colorful roses background. Beautiful, high quality, good for holidays, valentines's gift.

 

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow, and that means flowers are flying off the shelves.

 

In fact, Valentine’s Day is the “second-largest holiday next to Mother’s Day for the floral industry,” according to 1800Flowers via Fortune Magazine. It’s estimated that Americans will spend $2 billion on flowers this year, according to GoBankingRates.com.

 

If you’re the lucky recipient of a bouquet of flowers, here are some tips on how to make your bouquet last longer.

 

1. Clean vases are a must.

If whatever container you’re putting your stems in isn’t clean, bacteria will continue to grow and kill your flowers. MarthaStewart.com suggests scrubbing the vase with a mixture of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water before rinsing.

2. If a whole leaf is submerged underwater, tear it off.

When leaves remain underwater, they decompose and bacteria grows. You must keep bacteria at bay if you want your flowers to last.

3. The colder the water, the better.

When you want to cook vegetables, you steam them with warm water until they wilt and soften. Think about it like this … if you use room temperature or warm water, you’re causing the flowers soften. The colder your water, the better your results.

4. Cut stems at a 45-degree angle.

When you cut flower stems with scissors, you are constricting the straw-like tube that allows nutrients to reach the top of the flower. Use a Swiss Army knife for soft stems and a pair of bypass cutters for woody stems. Cut the stems at a 45-degree angle.

5. Measure flower food precisely.

Avoid taking the easy route and dumping flower food into the vase with your flowers. Too much flower food will poison your flowers, and too little flower food is somewhat pointless. Use the directions on the packet of flower food to follow the correct food-to-water ratio.

6. Fresh water is a must.

Every two days, or when the water gets cloudy, replace the water in the vase. With each water change, it’s recommended to clean the vase. Use the same recipe as above.

Does Thread Count Really Matter?


It’s estimated that a person will sleep for a third of his or her life. If you’re spending that much time in bed, you’d better make sure you like your sleeping conditions. Comfortable sheets are crucial for a good night of sleep, and many people don’t seek out the sheets that are best for them.

 

It’s often misunderstood that higher thread counts mean better sheets. While thread count is important, there are other factors to consider when on the hunt for the perfect sheets: the type of cotton, weave, and finish to name a few.

 

Still believe that those 1,000-thread count sheets you got for a bargain are the best out there? Read below and we’ll let you decide.

 

Fiber: Instead of focusing on thread count, evaluate the length of the sheet’s fiber: longer fibers are better than short and lend themselves to longer lifespans. In addition, Egyptian cotton isn’t a myth – it’s indeed an indication of the quality of the cotton. Make sure the label says 100 percent or pure Egyptian cotton, though, because sheets can be labeled “Egyptian” even if they only contain a small percentage of actual Egyptian cotton. Alternative options are Pima and Supima, cotton-poplin, cotton-polyester and even bamboo.

 
 

Weave: Weave is the last thing you should pay attention to and is the determining factor in how the sheets feel and the lifespan. Common weaves are percale or sateen — percale features a cool, crisp feel, while sateen is softer and warmer. When it comes to weave, pick what feels best to you.

 
 

Thread Count: Thread count is the number of threads woven into one square inch of fabric. Additional threads can be woven in, thus, increasing the thread count. In general, a higher thread count will make the sheets denser. It’s recommended to get anything over 200, but anything higher than 400 isn’t worth going out of your way for. The threads used to achieve these higher thread counts sheets are often thinner so they can all fit.

 
 

Cost: When it comes to sheets, quality is better over quantity. More expensive sets of 200-thread count sheets will generally be higher quality than a cheaper set of 400-thread count.

 
 

Finish: Sheets may contain bleaches, dyes, or finishes to keep them from wrinkling. If you have sensitivities or allergies, steer clear and opt for 100 percent organic sheets.

 
 

And there you have it. We hope this will help you the next time you’re in the market for new sheets. Sweet dreams!